Category Archives: Dog Care TIps

Interview w/ Kevyn Mathews – The Dog Chef

I recently got a chance to speak with Kevyn Mathews – Owner and Executive Chef of The Dog Chef.  I always say I wouldn’t give my dog anything that I wouldn’t eat myself.  Would you eat or even taste the food you give your dog now?  Let me tell you – This food looks and tastes great – really!  Kevyn has a culinary background which he has used to beautifully craft healthy, tasty and fresh dog meals and treats.   Want to treat your pup or improve his health through nutrition?  You can contact Kevyn at:   www.thedogchef.net His meals and treats are also sold at Whole Foods Market on P Street NW Washington, DC.

Listen to Interview w/Kevyn Mathews – The Dog Chef:

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Filed under Dog Care TIps, Dog Food, Dog Nutrition, Pet Nutrition

Grooming 101 – Part 2 Tools of the Trade

Ok so your ready to take the plunge and start brushing your dog at home.  Great!  Now lets make sure you have the proper tools to do so.

Hair Type – Smooth Coated or Short Coated

Breeds – Pointer, Vizsla, Weimaraner, Basenji, Greyhound, Boxer, Doberman, Great Dane, Staffordshire Terrier, Bull Terrier, Boston Terrier, Dalmatian, French Bull Dog, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Beagle, Coonhound, Foxhound, Bullmastiff, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, Rottweiler, Pug, Australian Cattle Dog, Belgian Malinois, Smooth Fox Terrier

Tools

The Furminator – de-shedding tool to remove loose hair (comes in small, medium, or large)

Curry/Rubber Brush – use to remove dead hair, massage skin

Hair Type – Combination Coated, Double Coated, or Heavy Coated

Breed – Brittany, Flat Coated Retriever, Golden Retriever American Water Spaniel, Sussex Spaniel, Australian Shepherd, Belgian Tervuren, Border Collie, Kuvasz, Borzoi, Tibetan Spaniel, Akita, Alaskan Malamute, Anatolian SHepherd, Siberian Husky, Norwegian Elkhound, German Shepherd, Smooth Coated Collie, Cardigan Welsh & Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Finnish Spitz, Shiba Inu, Bernese Mountain Dog, Great Pyrenees, Newfoundland, Saint Bernard, Samoyed, Rough Coated Collie, Shetland Sheepdog, American Eskimo, Chow Chow, Keeshond, Pomeranian

Tools

The V Rake – removes mats, removes undercoat on thick coats

Heavy Duty Rake – breaks up mats and tangles, pulls out undercoat while protecting the outer coat ( comes in different sizes)

Hair Type – Silky Coated, Natural Log Hair, or Curly or Wavy Coated

Breed – Cocker Spaniel, Afghan Hound, Bearded Collie, Briard, Old English Sheepdog, Skye Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Tibetan Terrier, Havanese, Maltese, Shih Tzu, Silky Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, Irish Water Spaniel, Kerry Blue Terrier, Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, Bedlington, Portuguese Water Dog, Bichon Frise, Poodle, Bouvier des Flandres

Tools

Slicker Brush – remove mats, debri and loose hair

Flexible Slicker Brush – flexible handle for less stress on hand and wrists

Greyhound Comb – fluffing, detangling, & removing dead hair; great to use to “check” for mats & tangles after brushing-if the comb does not glide through easily go over with brush again

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Filed under Dog Care TIps, Dog Grooming, Dog Grooming Equipment, Dog Hair

Grooming 101- Home Coat Care Part 1

Common questions of dog owners are How often should I get my dog groomed?  Why does my dog have to be clipped short?  What can I do at home in between professional grooming? These are all great questions!

All dogs shed!  Surprised?  Did I hear Scooby Doo say “Huh”? Smile.  Let me explain.  Shedding is a process by which your dog’s coat releases hair and allows for a new healthy coat to grow.  Dogs like Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, Collies and Beagles are high shedding dogs.  I’m sure you  may find small piles of hair in your house or on your clothes after petting your dog.  Dogs like Poodles, Maltese, and Cocker Spaniels shed as well.  However, the hair that is released stays in the coat and has to be brushed out.  Your dog’s coat can form tangles and mats.  Mats are formed from dirt and friction. Regular combing and brushing will prevent mats from forming.  Mats pull on the dogs skin and can cause skin problems.  Removing mats can be a very painful process.  The best and most humane thing to do is to clip the coat short.  Don’t worry-It will grow back!

Most dogs should be groomed every 4-6 weeks to maintain a healthy, matt free coat.  That works out to be 8-12 times a year.   To maintain the coat between professional grooming, you should brush your dog at least 3 times a week.  The most common mistake is to just brush the top layer of the coat.  Make sure to get to all the layers of the hair down to the skin.  If you and your dog are new to this start with short or brief sessions.  You may want to use treats for good cooperative behavior and lots of praise.  After you finish use a comb to go through the coat.  The comb should slide though without any snags if the coat is free of mats.

This may sound like a lot at first but you will build your own routine and it shouldn’t be a burden.  Your dog may even enjoy the bonding time.  What dog doesn’t like attention from it’s owner.  It will also keep your dog looking and smelling great and reduce grooming costs in the future.

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Filed under Dog Care TIps, Dog Grooming, Dog Hair

Hello world!

Hello Dog Lovers!  Welcome to Pupscale Grooming Blog.   I have decided to start a blog to inform the conscious dog owner about the upkeep and proper care of their pup who deserves upscale treatment without the upscale price.  This blog will feature:  news, info on special dog related events, grooming service promotions, trends in dog grooming, featured dog of the month, and educational info.  Check out the “About”  page to learn a little about me. Please subscribe to the blog;  I promise I will not share,sell, or trade your email address or saturate your inbox .

Enjoy a little dog groomer humor:

Contrary to the above cartoons, I am blessed with very well-behaved dogs. Some, I think, enjoy the process.  I, and I’m sure many other groomers have been asked the question:  ”Why does it cost more to get my dog groomed than my own haircut?” Well, over the years there is a growing list of answers.  Here are some that I have come across.  Have a little laugh.

  • Your hairdresser doesn’t give you a bath.
  • Your hairdresser doesn’t give you a manicure and pedicure.
  • You don’t try to bite or scratch your hairdresser.
  • You don’t wiggle, spin or try to jump out of the hairdresser’ s chair.
  • Your hairdresser only cuts the top of your head, not your whole body.
  • You don’t try to hump the hairdresser.
  • Your hairdresser doesn’t wipe boogies from your eyes.
  • Your hairdresser doesn’t pluck and clean your ears.
  • Your hairdresser doesn’t squeeze your anal glands.
  • You don’t poop or pee while you are getting your hair cut.
  • Your hairdresser does not remove fleas or ticks.
  • You don’t go 6 weeks (or more) without brushing or washing your hair.
  • Your hairdresser doesn’t brush your teeth.
  • You don’t try to bite the clippers. scissors, brush, nail clippers or dyer.
  • It doesn’t take 3 people to trim your nails.
  • Your hairdresser doesn’t have to de-matt your hair.
  • Your hairdresser would never wash your butt.
  • Your hair dresser doesn’t give you a “sanitary trim”.
  • Drying your hair doesn’t blow hair on  everything.
  • You don’t howl or bark while having all this done!

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Filed under Dog Care TIps, Dog Groomer Humor/Comedy, Dog Grooming, Dog Grooming Humor